Jan. 17, 2014

Matt Smith Team is hiring!

Real Estate Assistant Duties:

2 years real estate experience and active real estate license required.

1.  Listing Manager (Listing to Contract)

  • Oversee all aspects of sellers transactions from initial contact to executed purchase agreement.
  • Prepare all listing materials: pre-listing presentation, Listing Agreement, sellers’ disclosures, comparative market analysis, pull online property profile, research old multiple listing service (MLS) listings and etc.
  • Consult & coordinate with sellers all property photos, staging, repairs, cleaning, signage, lockbox, access requirements & marketing activities.
  • Obtain all necessary signatures on listing agreement, disclosures and other necessary documentation.
  • Coordinate showings & obtain feedback.
  • Provide proactive weekly feedback to sellers regarding all showings and marketing activities.
  • Coordinate all public open houses and broker open houses.
  • Input all listing information into MLS and marketing websites and update as needed.
  • Submit all necessary documentation to office broker for file compliance.
  • Input all necessary information into client database and transaction management systems.

2.  Transaction Coordinator (Contract to Closing)

  • Oversee all aspects of buyer & seller transactions from executed purchase agreement to closing.
  • Coordinate title/escrow, mortgage loan and appraisal processes.
  • Coordinate inspections, assist in negotiations regarding repairs, and coordinate completion of repairs.
  • Regularly update & maintain communication with clients, agents, title officer, lender etc.
  • Submit all necessary documentation to office broker for file compliance.
  • Coordinate moving/possession schedules.
  • Schedule, coordinate & attend closing process.
  • Input all client information into client database system.
  • Schedule 30 Day, 90 Day & 120 Day client customer service follow up calls to assist with any home improvement provider recommendations and to ask for referrals.

3.  Marketing Director

  • Manage client database management program & system.
  • Create & regularly prepare all buyer & seller consultation packages.
  • Coordinate the preparation of all listing & open house flyers, graphics, signage and all other marketing materials.
  • Manage & update agent website(s), blog(s) and online listings.
  • Regularly assist agent to manage & enhance agent’s social media presence.
  • Track & coordinate all inbound leads from websites, social media & other online sources.
  • Coordinate all client & vendor appreciation events.
  • Regularly obtain client testimonials for websites, social media & other marketing materials.
  • Coordinate & implement agent marketing videos & property videos on website(s), blog(s), social media and client database email campaigns.

4.  Administrative Manager

  • Oversee all aspects of the administration of the agent’s business.
  • Create & manage all systems for sellers, buyers, client database management, lead generation tracking, lead follow-up & all office administration.
  • Maintain all agent financial systems, profit & loss statement, bill payment, budget(s), bank accounts, and business credit card(s).
  • Coordinate the purchasing of any office equipment, marketing materials and any other business related supplies and materials.
  • Create & update a business operations manual and all job descriptions/employment contracts for any future hires.
  • Manage the recruiting, hiring, training and ongoing leadership of all future administrative hires.
  • Hold agent(s) accountable for conducting all agreed upon lead generation activities.
  • Ensure that all agent activities are limited to listing property, showing property, negotiating contracts & lead generation.

Please send cover letter and resume to:

Mattsmithremax@gmail.com

The Matt Smith Team is Hiring! Seeks Dynamic, Career Minded Full Time Buyer Specialist.

The Matt Smith Team – Is seeking a Dynamic, High-Energy and Career minded, full-time buyer specialist to join our team.

Are you a highly motivated and dedicated person who is looking for an excellent long-term opportunity in the real estate industry?

Our Remax team located in Cedar Rapids, IA is the solution for you! Our team provides potential for advancement based on your performance.

Your training will be with Matt Smith, who is one of the top real estate coaches in the industry along with our exceptional marketing group.

You should have the following abilities and qualifications for this opportunity as a buyer specialist:

- Able to commit to 3 hours daily lead generation and follow up

- Speak well and have excellent follow-up phone skills

- Ability to demonstrate continued learning and self-improvement through education and accounting.

- Be a team player focused on the success of all through accountability for your work and the team.

- Commit to goals based on team, member and client needs.
- Have a current real estate license

- Demonstrate local knowledge of Linn and Johnson County Real Estate

- Have an impeccable reputation for integrity in the real estate community.

- Possess a deep passion for service and success.

- Be personable and comfortable networking and socializing with all different types of personalities.

- Previous sales and real estate agent success

We are seeking career minded buyer agents capable of committing to excellent communication and relationship skills. Our Buyer Agent position is NOT a part-time position, and you, as the right candidate, are willing and able to work nights and weekends.

Candidates are currently being interviewed for this position. If you feel our Buyer Agent position fits your career goals, you should send your resume along with three references along with your social media profile links toMattSmithRemax@gmail.com today!

Feb. 19, 2013

3639-STONEY-POINT-RD-SW-Cedar-Rapids-IA-52404

College Community Condo Just Listed!

 

http://www.cedar-rapids-iowa-homes-for-sale.com/search/details/7wc/0/

July 10, 2012

Rich Dad Talks about real estate

Watch live streaming video from richdadlivechat at livestream.com
June 29, 2012

Credit Improvement Programs

June 22, 2012

Pocket up to $125,000 for incorrect foreclosure filing

 

June 20, 2012

10 Mistakes New Home Buyers Make

10 Mistakes New Homebuyers Make (via Credit.com)

With mortgage rates continually hitting new lows and many real estate forecasters predicting a housing bottom at the end of the year, many renters are getting the urge to buy. That leaves a housing market full of inexperienced, but interested buyers who need a little more help and guidance in navigating…


June 18, 2012

The ReMax Collection Cedar Rapids Real Estate

When you're looking for amazing marketing and representation.  Talk to the Matt Smith Team at Remax Associates.

 

May 18, 2012

3817 Riverside Dr. NE Cedar Rapids, Iowa

 

New Listing priced at $209,950

Posted in NE Properties
Feb. 28, 2012

Home repairs: Which jobs come first?

(MONEY Magazine) -- Lean times call for budgetary triage. But while you should clearly opt for orthodontics before Disneyland, the choice is tougher when it comes to home maintenance.

Should you get a paint job or a new furnace? "There's no homeowner's manual that tells you when to do what," says Naperville, Ill., home inspector and structural engineer Mark Waldman.

Emergencies aside, the project that could cause the most damage and expense if left unfixed is the priority. Below, the order in which to tackle your biggest repair needs.

1. Electrical system

Wiring problems claim the No. 1 spot for good reason: They can lead to fires and electrocution. "That trumps everything," says Waldman.

Danger signs: Circuit breakers that trip frequently, lights that dim when you turn on the vacuum or outlets that are loose, hot, or accept only two-prong plugs.

How to check: Spend $300 to $500 for a licensed electrician to open up your main panel to look for trouble and to tighten any loose connections. He'll also spot-check switches, outlets and light fixtures to ensure that the wiring is in safe working order.

Replacement cost: $4,000 to $10,000 to rewire the house.

Prolong its life: Flip every circuit breaker off and on again once a year to prevent corrosion. Add new circuits ($100 to $500 each) to take the heaviest electrical loads, like window air conditioners, off the old wires.

2. Basement

Structural problems downstairs mean shifting and cracking upstairs -- at the very least -- so there's little point in doing other repairs until you've fixed the building's foundation.

Danger signs: Bowed or split beams, rotted posts, piles of sawdust (evidence of wood-boring insects), tiny mud trails (indications of termites), or large cracks in the masonry foundation -- especially if the cracks are horizontal, which tends to indicate a bigger problem.

How to check: A contractor will usually take a look free of charge. If he recommends significant repairs, hire a home inspection engineer (find one at nabie.org) to investigate ($350 to $500).

Replacement cost: Major foundation work can cost $3,500 to $8,000; new posts or beams could run $1,200 to $2,500.

Prolong its life: Water is the cause of cracked concrete, rotten timbers and wood-eating pests. So keep your basement dry by making sure the landscape slopes away from the house and maintaining the next two items on the list: the roof and gutters.

3. Roof

Water leaking into your home from above can lead to a host of pricey problems: rot, insects, electrical shorts and mold.

Danger signs: Dampness or stains on ceilings; curling, missing, or broken shingles; smooth spots where the granules have worn away; green algae growth.

How to check: Have a roofer inspect your home. This is typically free, but the pro, of course, is looking for business. So check the company's reputation at angieslist.com ($5 a month).

Replacement cost: $5,000 to $15,000

Prolong its life: Prune tree limbs so they're at least 10 feet from the roof to keep squirrels away and to let moisture evaporate quickly after storms. If shingles blow off, replace them immediately, and repair small leaks promptly.

4. Gutters

Your gutters are just as important as the roof. The only reason they're lower on this list is that if you replace gutters first, they're likely to get damaged when you reroof later. So if you need a roof too, it's better to wait -- or do both projects at the same time.

Danger signs: Dented or disconnected gutters, pooled water around your home's foundation, or basement flooding near the downspouts.

How to check: Head outside during a rainstorm and watch the gutters in action, says Caitlin Corkins, stewardship manager for Historic New England, which maintains dozens of historic properties. "The best time to see clogs and overflows is when the system is working," she says.

Replacement cost: $1,500 to $3,000

Prolong its life: Hire a gutter company to clean, check, and repair your gutters ($100 to $200) at least once a year -- two or three times if you're in a wooded area. And have someone clear the eaves of deep snow to prevent icing, which can split open gutters or rip them right off the house.

5. Exterior walls

"People think paint is just a decorative element, so they let it go," says Robert Niemeyer, a Winston-Salem, N.C., handyman, contractor, and electrician. But without a weather-tight seal, water can infiltrate the siding, causing rot and attracting wood-damaging insects. Still, leaks from a vertical surface generally aren't as quick or lethal as ones from a roof and gutter.

Danger signs: Paint that's peeling, cracking or blistering

Replacement cost: $4,000 to $10,000; make sure the painters replace loose putty around the window glass and caulking gaps around molding.

Prolong its life: Hire a pro to do touchups every year. Trim foliage so it's at least a foot from the house, and kill any mildew growth with a bleach-and-water solution.

6. Aging equipment

An old heating or cooling system is costly to operate -- and the risk of a breakdown increases with age. But as long as your old furnace, boiler, or AC is operating safely, there's no rush to upgrade.

Danger signs: The system cycles on and off frequently to hold your thermostat setting; you spot corrosion on the vent pipe; the natural-gas flames are yellow or orange instead of pure blue.

How to check: Get a repair estimate: if it's more than a third of the replacement cost, spring for a new machine, says Indianapolis plumber Larry Howald.

Send The Help Desk your questions

Replacement cost: Typically $2,000 to $4,000 for a furnace (forced air); $4,000 to $8,000 for a boiler (hot water); $1,000 to $3,000 for a water heater; $6,000 to $10,000 for an air conditioner.

Prolong its life: Have your systems cleaned and tuned annually, including flushing the water heater to remove sludge, replacing all filters and lubricating any pumps.

MONEY magazine is researching an article on ways to reduce the financial pain of college. We're looking for families that can talk about new and creative ways that they're raising cash for college and cutting costs while they're there. Sound like you? Tell us your story and you might even get your picture in the magazine! E-mail Beth_Braverman@moneymail.com

Feb. 16, 2012

Consumer Credit Counseling Service

Improving Your Credit

(taken from Federal Trade Commission website: www.ftc.gov)

You see the advertisements in newspapers, on TV, and on the Internet. You hear them on the radio. You get fliers in the mail, and maybe even calls offering credit repair services. They all make the same claims:

“Credit problems? No problem!”
“We can remove bankruptcies, judgments, liens, and bad loans from your credit file forever!”
“We can erase your bad credit — 100% guaranteed.”
“Create a new credit identity — legally.”

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) says do yourself a favor and save some money, too. Don’t believe these claims: they’re very likely signs of a scam. Indeed, attorneys at the nation’s consumer protection agency say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation making those claims. The fact is there’s no quick fix for creditworthiness. You can improve your credit report legitimately, but it takes time, a conscious effort, and sticking to a personal debt repayment plan.

Recognizing a Credit Repair Scam

Everyday, companies target consumers who have poor credit histories with promises to clean up their credit report so they can get a car loan, a home mortgage, insurance, or even a job once they pay them a fee for the service. The truth is, these companies can’t deliver an improved credit report for you using the tactics they promote. It’s illegal: No one can remove accurate negative information from your credit report. So after you pay them hundreds or thousands of dollars in fees, you’re left with the same credit report and someone else has your money.

If you see a credit repair offer, here’s how to tell if the company behind it is up to no good:

 

  • The company wants you to pay for credit repair services before they provide any services. Under the Credit Repair Organizations Act, credit repair companies cannot require you to pay until they have completed the services they have promised.
  • The company doesn’t tell you your rights and what you can do for yourself for free.
  • The company recommends that you do not contact any of the three major national credit reporting companies directly.
  • The company tells you they can get rid of most or all the negative credit information in your credit report, even if that information is accurate and current.
  • The company suggests that you try to invent a “new” credit identity — and then, a new credit report — by applying for an Employer Identification Number to use instead of your Social Security number.
  • The company advises you to dispute all the information in your credit report, regardless of its accuracy or timeliness.

If you follow illegal advice and commit fraud, you may find yourself in legal hot water, too: It’s a federal crime to lie on a loan or credit application, to misrepresent your Social Security number, and to obtain an Employer Identification Number from the Internal Revenue Service under false pretenses. You could be charged and prosecuted for mail or wire fraud if you use the mail, telephone, or Internet to apply for credit and provide false information.

Your Rights Regarding Credit Repair

No one can legally remove accurate and timely negative information from a credit report. The law allows you to ask for an investigation of information in your file that you dispute as inaccurate or incomplete. There is no charge for this. Some people hire a company to investigate on their behalf, but anything a credit repair clinic can do legally, you can do for yourself at little or no cost. According to the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA):

 

  • You’re entitled to a free report if a company takes “adverse action” against you, like denying your application for credit, insurance, or employment. You have to ask for your report within 60 days of receiving notice of the action. The notice will give you the name, address, and phone number of the consumer reporting company. You’re also entitled to one free report a year if you’re unemployed and plan to look for a job within 60 days; if you’re on welfare; or if your report is inaccurate because of fraud, including identity theft.
  • Each of the nationwide consumer reporting companies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — is required to provide you with a free copy of your credit report once every 12 months, if you ask for it. The three companies have a central website, a toll-free telephone number, and a mailing address for consumers to order the free annual credit reports the government entitles them to. To order, click on annualcreditreport.com, call 1-877-322-8228, or complete the Annual Credit Report Request Form and mail it to:

                Annual Credit Report Request Service 
                P.O. Box 105281 
                Atlanta, GA 30348-5281

You can use the form in this brochure, or you can print it from ftc.gov/credit. You may order reports from each of the three consumer reporting companies at the same time, or you can stagger your requests, ordering one from each company throughout the year from the central address. Don’t contact the three nationwide consumer reporting companies individually or at another address because you may end up paying for a report that you’re entitled to get for free. In fact, each consumer reporting company may charge you up to $10.50 to purchase an additional copy of your report within a 12-month period. 

  • It doesn’t cost anything to dispute mistakes or outdated items on your credit report. Under the FCRA, both the consumer reporting company and the information provider (that is, the person, company, or organization that provides information about you to a consumer reporting company) are responsible for correcting inaccurate or incomplete information in your report. To take advantage of all your rights under the FCRA, contact the consumer reporting company and the information provider.

 

Helping Yourself

Step 1: Tell the consumer reporting company, in writing, what information you think is inaccurate. Include copies (NOT originals) of any documents that support your position. In addition to providing your complete name and address, your letter should identify each item in your report you dispute; state the facts and the reasons you dispute the information, and ask that it be removed or corrected. You may want to enclose a copy of your report, and circle the items in question. Send your letter by certified mail, “return receipt requested,” so you can document that the consumer reporting company received it. Keep copies of your dispute letter and enclosures. Your letter may look something like the one below.

Sample Dispute Letter

Date
Your Name
Your Address,
City, State, Zip Code

Complaint Department
Name of Company
Address
City, State, Zip Code

Dear Sir or Madam:

I am writing to dispute the following information in my file. The items I dispute also are encircled on the attached copy of the report I received.

This item (identify item(s) disputed by name of source, such as creditors or tax court, and identify type of item, such as credit account, judgment, etc.) is (inaccurate or incomplete) because (describe what is inaccurate or incomplete and why). I am requesting that the item be deleted (or request another specific change) to correct the information.

Enclosed are copies of (use this sentence if applicable and describe any enclosed documentation, such as payment records, court documents) supporting my position. Please investigate this (these) matter(s) and (delete or correct) the disputed item(s) as soon as possible.

Sincerely,
Your name

Enclosures: (List what you are enclosing.)

Consumer reporting companies must investigate the items you question within 30 days — unless they consider your dispute frivolous. They also must forward all the relevant data you provide about the inaccuracy to the organization that provided the information. After the information provider receives notice of a dispute from the consumer reporting company, it is required to investigate, review the relevant information, and report the results back to the consumer reporting company. If this investigation reveals that the disputed information is inaccurate, the information provider has to notify the nationwide consumer reporting companies so they can correct it in your file.

When the investigation is complete, the consumer reporting company must give you the results in writing, too, and a free copy of your report if the dispute results in a change. If an item is changed or deleted, the consumer reporting company is not permitted to put the disputed information back in your file unless the information provider verifies that it is accurate and complete. The consumer reporting company also must send you written notice that includes the name, address, and phone number of the information provider. If you ask, the consumer reporting company must send notices of any correction to anyone who received your report in the past six months. You also can ask that a corrected copy of your report be sent to anyone who received a copy during the past two years for employment purposes.

If an investigation doesn’t resolve your dispute with the consumer reporting company, you can ask that a statement of the dispute be included in your file and in future reports. You also can ask the consumer reporting company to provide your statement to anyone who received a copy of your report in the recent past. You can expect to pay for this service.

Step 2: Tell the creditor or other information provider, in writing, that you dispute an item. Be sure to include copies (NOT originals) of documents that support your position. Many providers specify an address for disputes. If the provider reports the item to a consumer reporting company, it must include a notice of your dispute. And if you are correct — that is, if the information is found to be inaccurate — the information provider may not report it again.

Reporting Accurate Negative Information

When negative information in your report is accurate, only the passage of time can assure its removal. A consumer reporting company can report most accurate negative information for seven years and bankruptcy information for 10 years. Information about an unpaid judgment against you can be reported for seven years or until the statute of limitations runs out, whichever is longer. To calculate the seven-year reporting period, start from the date the event took place. There is no time limit on reporting information about criminal convictions; information reported in response to your application for a job that pays more than $75,000 a year; and information reported because you’ve applied for more than $150,000 worth of credit or life insurance.

The Credit Repair Organizations Act

Credit repair organizations must give you a copy of the “Consumer Credit File Rights Under State and Federal Law” before you sign a contract. They also must give you a written contract that spells out your rights and obligations. Read these documents before you sign anything. And before signing, know that a credit repair company cannot:

 

  • make false claims about their services
  • charge you until they have completed the promised services
  • perform any services until they have your signature on a written contract and have completed a three-day waiting period. During this time, you can cancel the contract without paying any fees.

Before you sign a contract, be sure it specifies: 

  • the payment terms for services, including the total cost
  • a detailed description of the services the company will perform
  • how long it will take to achieve the result
  • any guarantees the company offer
  • the company’s name and business address

 

Have You Been Victimized?

Many states have laws regulating credit repair companies. State law enforcement officials may be helpful if you’ve lost money to credit repair scams. Don’t be embarrassed to report a problem with a credit repair company. While you may fear that contacting the government could make your problems worse, remember that laws are in place to protect you. Contact your local consumer affairs office or your state Attorney General (AGs). Many AGs have toll-free consumer hotlines; check the Blue Pages of your telephone directory for the phone number or www.naag.org for a list of state attorneys general.

If You Need Help

Just because you have a poor credit report doesn’t mean you can’t get credit. Creditors set their own standards, and not all look at your credit history the same way. Some may look only at recent years to evaluate you for credit, and they may give you credit if your bill-paying history has improved. It may be worthwhile to contact creditors informally to discuss their credit standards.

If you’re not disciplined enough to create a workable budget and stick to it, to work out a repayment plan with your creditors, or to keep track of your mounting bills, you might consider contacting a credit counseling organization. Many credit counseling organizations are nonprofit and work with you to solve your financial problems. But remember that “nonprofit” status doesn’t guarantee free, affordable, or even legitimate services. In fact, some credit counseling organizations — even some that claim non-profit status — may charge high fees or hide their fees by pressuring consumers to make “voluntary” contributions that only cause more debt.

Most credit counselors offer services through local offices, the Internet, or on the telephone. If possible, find an organization that offers in-person counseling. Many universities, military bases, credit unions, housing authorities, and branches of the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service operate nonprofit credit counseling programs. Your financial institution, local consumer protection agency, and friends and family also may be good sources of information and referrals.

If you are considering filing for bankruptcy, be aware that bankruptcy laws require that you get credit counseling from a government-approved organization within six months before you file for bankruptcy relief. You can find a state-by-state list of government-approved organizations at www.usdoj.gov/ust, the website of the U.S. Trustee Program. That’s the organization within the U.S. Department of Justice that supervises bankruptcy cases and trustees. Be wary of credit counseling organizations that say they are government-approved, but do not appear on the list of approved organizations.

Reputable credit counseling organizations can advise you on managing your money and debts, help you develop a budget, and offer free educational materials and workshops. Their counselors are certified and trained in the areas of consumer credit, money and debt management, and budgeting. Counselors discuss your entire financial situation with you, and can help you develop a personalized plan to solve your money problems. An initial counseling session typically lasts an hour, with an offer of follow-up sessions.

Do-It-Yourself Check-Up

Regardless of your credit history, financial advisors and consumer advocates recommend reviewing your credit report periodically for three important reasons:

 

  1. The information in your credit report affects whether you can get a loan or insurance — and how much you will have to pay for it.
  2. It’s important to make sure the information is accurate, complete, and up-to-date before you apply for a loan for a major purchase like a house or car, buy insurance, or apply for a job.
  3. It can help you deter, detect and defend against identity theft. That’s when someone uses your personal information — like your name, your Social Security number, or your credit card number — to commit fraud. Identity thieves may use your information to open a new credit card account in your name. Then, when they don’t pay the bills, the delinquent account is reported on your credit report. Inaccurate information like that could affect your ability to get credit, insurance, or even a job.

 

For More Information

To learn how to improve your credit worthiness and find legitimate resources for low or no-cost help, please see the following publications at ftc.gov/credit.

 

  •  Your Access to Free Credit Reports— Explains why it is important to monitor your credit history, how to request a report, and how to dispute errors.
  •  How to Dispute Credit Report Errors— Explains how to dispute and correct inaccurate information in your credit report. Includes a sample dispute letter.
  • Building a Better Credit Report — Learn how to legally improve your credit report, how to deal with debt, how to spot credit-related scams, and more.
  • Knee Deep in Debt — Discusses options to help you get back in the black, including: realistic budgeting, credit counseling from a reputable organization, debt consolidation, or bankruptcy.
  •  Fiscal Fitness: Choosing a Credit Counselor— Defines debt repayment plans, explains the differences between secured and unsecured debt, and offers questions to ask credit counseling agencies if you consider using their services.

The FTC works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint or to get free information on consumer issues, visit ftc.gov or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters consumer complaints into the Consumer Sentinel Network, a secure online database and investigative tool used by hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.